10 Things People Should Know About Chronic Pain

male going through chronic pain

If you’re suffering from any pain that lasts longer than 6 months, this is defined as chronic pain.

With more than 50 million Americans suffering from chronic pain, you’re certainly not alone if long-long-term pain is creating mayhem in your life.

Whether this pain stems from a simple headache, back pain, rheumatic pain, or the pain caused by cancer and its treatment, there’s nothing we can do to remove pain from the equation.

What we can do, though, if effectively manage most types of pain, so don’t lose hope.

If someone in your life is experiencing this form of ongoing pain, here are 10 things you should take into account to get a better understanding of how pain is impacting your loved one. The more you know, the more you can to make things easier for them.

10 Things People Only People with Chronic Pain Understand

  1. You’re not feeling this way through choice
  2. Not all doctors are trained to deal with chronic pain effectively
  3. Symptoms of chronic pain can be complex and debilitating
  4. Not all chronic pain is equal
  5. Many people with chronic pain also frequently feel guilty
  6. You don’t always want advice, even when it’s well-intentioned
  7. The emotional impact of chronic pain should not be underestimated
  8. You wake up each day not knowing how you will feel
  9. You are not making a mountain out of a molehill
  10. Time does not decrease the pain experienced

1) You’re not feeling this way through choice

If you find yourself stricken with any form of chronic pain, you’ve doubtless experienced well-intentioned friends and family telling you to “Snap out of it” or “Get over it.”

While it can be frustrating if a loved one is suffering from chronic pain, imagine how this feels for them. If it’s tough watching them struggle, how much worse would it be to experience ongoing pain of an intense nature?

Understand that if a family member has any form of chronic pain, they’ll be doing absolutely everything possible to drive this menace from their life. Don’t make things harder on them.

2) Not all doctors are trained to deal with chronic pain effectively

While it’s only natural to imagine your doctor has the power to fix any problem you bring to his attention, many doctors lack a deep understanding of chronic pain. Medical school doesn’t dig too deep into this specialty.

When you first start seeking suitable pain management for chronic pain, finding a suitably experienced doctor is key.

It’s always possible to supplement treatment by seeking out the services of a pain specialist in Gilbert Arizona.

3) Symptoms of chronic pain can be complex and debilitating

If a loved one has issues with chronic pain, try to understand that symptoms can include more than just a generalized pain.

From headaches and brain fog to muscle cramps, problems with vision, and nausea or gastrointestinal problems, life becomes hard with chronic pain in the mix.

When any family member has chronic pain, you should do all that you can to help them while trying to understand as much about their condition as possible.

4) Not all chronic pain is equal

Every individual with chronic pain experiences this in a different way.

Also, everyone has a varying tolerance to pain.

Some people can head off chronic pain by popping a couple of paracetamol. For others, it might be a heated pad or an ice pack that comes to the rescue. When chronic pain gets unbearable, it might be all your loved one can do to lay prone in a darkened room.

Be clear that not all chronic pain is the same, and everyone’s reaction to this pain is different.

5) Many people with chronic pain also frequently feel guilty

If your loved one is frequently forced to cancel plans due to unexpected bouts of crippling pain, chances are that they’re feeling guilty about this.

Now, even though the person knows this is not their fault, they likely still feel bad if they constantly need to bail out on arrangements.

Do all you can to reassure your loved one that there’s nothing they can do about this pain apart from what they’re already doing.

6) You don’t always want advice, even when it’s well-intentioned

Refrain from handing out unsolicited advice to chronic pain sufferers.

From being grilled about what you eat to being bombarded with suggestions of “This one thing that might really work…”

 Someone who wants advice will almost always ask for it. Throw lots of suggestions like this at someone asking for chronic pain and you will likely make them feel worse not better.

7) The emotional impact of chronic pain should not be underestimated

Expect anyone with chronic pain blighting their lives to be dealing with tumultuous emotional swings.

Chronic pain takes a toll on you mentally as well as physically.

If you find someone you know seems to have a very short fuse and responds in anger frequently, ask yourself what role their chronic pain is playing in this. Again, do what you can to help out.

8) You wake up each day not knowing how you will feel

Chronic pain might be ongoing but that doesn’t mean it conforms to a schedule.

The randomness of attacks of pain can make things awkward across the board for anyone suffering from it. Do whatever you can to avoid making fixed arrangements. Also, remember to be accommodating in the event of cancellation.

9) You are not making a mountain out of a molehill

Since studies show that we tend to underestimate the pain others feel, never for a moment accuse anyone suffering from chronic pain of making a mountain out of a molehill. If anything, they are probably downplaying how bad they feel.

10) Time does not decrease the pain experienced

Last but not least, don’t think that someone becomes used to pain just because they’ve had it with him for months on end.

Final Thoughts

If you know someone dealing with chronic pain in their life, perhaps today’s brief exploration will make it easier for you to understand just what they’re going through.

Schedule an appointment with a pain doctor in Arizona instead of taking what chronic pain throws your way in silence. Call us today at 480-550-9393.